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Search Results for sesquicentennial

  • Emancipation Proclamation Revisitied: Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau

    May 13, 2014 — Huntington, Cabell WVHC Event

    “Emancipation Proclamation Revisited,” Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau w/Michael Woods. 10:30 AM May 13 at Fifth Avenue Baptist Church, Huntington.

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Circuit_rider_illustration_eggleston_sq Methodists and West Virginia Statehood: Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau

    June 21, 2014 — Kingwood, Preston WVHC Event

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau lecturer Matthew Foulds will talk on Methodists and West Virginia Statehood at 1:00PM, June 21 at the McGrew House in Kingwood.

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Mothers of Martyrs: Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau

    June 28, 2014 — Huntersville, Pocahontas WVHC Event

    Katharine Antolini of the Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau will talk on Mothers of Martyrs: Women and Civil War Commemoration, 7:00PM June 28 at the Old Presbyterian Church in Huntersville.

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Methodists and West Virginia Statehood: Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau

    July 15, 2014 — Morgantown, Monongalia WVHC Event

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau lecturer Matthew Foulds will talk on Methodists and West Virginia Statehood at 7:00PM, July 15 at Spruce Street United Methodist Church in Morgantown.

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • West Virginians and the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln: Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau

    April 07, 2015 — Keyser, Mineral WVHC Event

    West Virginians and the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Speakers Bureau with Michael Woods, 7 PM April 7 at Potomac State College, Keyser

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Women and Civil War Commemoration: Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau

    April 12, 2015 — Union, Monroe WVHC Event

    Women and Civil War Commemoration with Katharine Antolini, 2PM April 12 at Ames Claire Hall in Union.

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • From the Burning of Chambersburg to the Battle of Moorefield

    March 04, 2014 — Charleston, Kanawha

    On March 4, 2014, Rick Wolfe will present “From the Burning of Chambersburg to the Battle of Moorefield” at the Tuesday evening lecture in the Archives and History Library in the Culture Center in Charleston. The program will begin at 6:00 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

    In the summer of 1864, General Jubal Early moved his Confederate army down the Shenandoah Valley and east to threaten Washington, DC. His mission was to create confusion and draw Union soldiers and resources away from General Ulysses S. Grant’s campaign to destroy General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Early dispatched two cavalry brigades under the command of General John McCausland to burn Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. Afterwards, Union cavalry under the command of William W. Averell pursued the town burners. They caught up with the Confederates in Hardy County, resulting in the Battle of Moorefield.

    A native of Morgantown, Richard A. Wolfe spent 26 years in the Marine Corps, retiring as a major in 1998. Since then, he has worked in the information technology field with the Department of Justice and in December 2013 retired from Lockheed Martin. Wolfe has been a long-time student of the American Civil War, especially as it relates to West Virginia. He is associated with the Clarksburg and Morgantown Civil War Roundtables, is president of Rich Mountain Battlefield Foundation, and is a volunteer on the Civil War Task Force for West Virginia’s Division of Tourism, which is responsible for West Virginia Civil War Trails. In June 2009, Wolfe was appointed by Governor Manchin to the West Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission. He is the author of a book in the Images of America series titled West Virginia in the Civil War.

    On March 4, the library will close at 5:00 p.m. and reopen at 5:45 p.m. for participants only. For planning purposes, participants are encouraged to register for the lecture, but advance registration is not required. To register in advance, contact Robert Taylor, library manager, by e-mail at Bobby.L.Taylor@wv.gov or at (304) 558-0230, ext. 163. Participants interested in registering by e-mail should send their name, telephone number and the name and date of the session. For additional information, contact the Archives and History Library at (304) 558-0230.

  • Stonewall Jackson, History Alive!

    May 17, 2014 — Lost River, Hardy WVHC Event

    Stonewall Jackson, History Alive!, 11am and 2pm May 17 at Lost River Museum.

    History Alive! is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Archives and History Tuesday Lecture: From Lost State to Mountain State

    August 05, 2014 — Charleston, Kanawha

    On Tuesday, August 5, 2014, Kevin T. Barksdale will present “From Lost State to Mountain State: The State of Franklin and the Constitutionality of West Virginia Statehood” in the Archives and History Library in the Culture Center in Charleston. The program will begin at 6:00 p.m. and is free and open to the public.

    In 1784, the political leaders of what would become eastern Tennessee (then part of the state of North Carolina) initiated an effort to create America’s fourteenth state. Naming their new state after venerable statesmen Benjamin Franklin, the leaders of Franklin engaged in a four-year struggle to gain admission into the Union while battling the region’s Native American communities and a determined internal opposition party. Over Franklin’s tumultuous four-year existence, the leadership managed to erect a state government, judicial system, and militia. The Franklinites also drafted a new state constitution and launched a determined campaign to win public and political support for their state. Despite their efforts, the state of Franklin ultimately collapsed in early 1788, but not before leaving behind a constitutional legacy that would play a central role in the creation of the state of West Virginia in 1863. Barksdale will explore the history of the state of Franklin and its impact on the drafting on the United States Constitution and the creation of the Mountain State nearly eighty years later.

    Kevin T. Barksdale is an associate professor of history at Marshall University where he teaches courses on West Virginia, Appalachian, and 18th-century American history. He has published a book on the state of Franklin entitled The Lost State of Franklin: America’s First Secession (2008) and is currently working on a project that explores the history of the decade following the American Revolution in the lower Mississippi Valley. Barksdale also serves on the West Virginia Humanities Council and West Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission.

    On August 5, the library will close at 5:00 p.m. and reopen at 5:45 p.m. for participants only. For additional information, call (304) 558-0230.

  • Sixth Annual Otis K. Rice History Lecture

    September 25, 2014 — Montgomery, Kanawha

    Thursday, September 25, 2014 at 6 p.m. in WVU Tech’s Engineering Auditorium in Montgomery, West Virginia. Q&A and reception will follow formal presentation.

    Dr. Connie Rice, state history scholar, WVU lecturer and Assistant Editor at West Virginia History: A Journal of Regional Studies, will discuss slavery and emancipation in Civil War-era West Virginia at the sixth annual Otis K. Rice lecture at WVU Tech. The free lecture is open to the public, and will be held on Thursday, September 25 at 6 p.m. in the WVU Tech engineering auditorium.

    Dr. Rice, who serves on the Governor’s West Virginia Sesquicentennial of the American Civil War Commission, has conducted extensive research and penned numerous publications on the history of women and blacks in the Appalachian region. Her lecture is particularly timely, as history marks 150 years since the American Civil War. Her lecture, “Nothing but Freedom: Bondage and Emancipation in West Virginia,” will examine slavery, the Underground Railroad and political attitudes towards black citizenship during the statehood movement. Dr. Rice will also discuss post-war freedoms, registration laws targeting free blacks and petitions made by African Americans to the Virginia legislature during the period.

    The memorial lecture series was started in 2009 to honor the legacy of noted West Virginia historian, Dr. Otis K. Rice, who served at WVU Tech for 30 years between 1957 and 1987, authored numerous books on state history and became the state’s first Historian Laureate in 2003.

  • Mothers of Martyrs: Women and Civil War Commemoration

    October 21, 2014 — Institute, Kanawha WVHC Event

    Mothers of Martyrs: Women and Civil War Commemoration, Speakers Bureau with Katharine Antolini. 12:30 PM October 21 at 122 Wallace Hall, West Virginia State University, Institute.

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Marc_030p_sq What Holds Us Together: Little Lecture

    April 26, 2015 — Charleston, Kanawha WVHC Event

    Sunday, April 26 at 2:00 PM

    What Holds Us Together: Marc Harshman

    Marc Harshman, poet laureate of West Virginia, will explore how poetry and storytelling have not only shaped his life, but how the humanities shape the life of a nation. In a talk he promises to be filled with poetry and stories, he will discuss how an attitude of attentiveness helps lift the human spirit and so can inspire us to engage our world with greater humanity and purpose. In this era of information overload, Harshman believes that by embracing the whimsy and gravity to be found in the arts and letters, we have the resources needed to nurture body politic of our nation in many useful and profound ways.

    Marc Harshman is the poet laureate of West Virginia appointed by Governor Earl Ray Tomblin in May, 2012. His full-length collection, GREEN-SILVER AND SILENT, was published by Bottom Dog Press later that same year. Four chapbooks of poems include ALL THAT FEEDS US: THE WEST VIRGINIA POEMS published in 2013 to celebrate Marc’s appointment. Periodical publications include Shenandoah, Wilderness, The Progressive, Appalachian Heritage, and many others. Poems have been anthologized by the University of Georgia, Kent State University, the University of Iowa, and the University of Arizona. His eleven children’s books include THE STORM, a Smithsonian Notable Book. His children’s titles have been published in Spanish, Japanese, Korean, Danish, and Swedish.

    Three new children’s titles are forthcoming. Marc holds degrees from Bethany College, Yale Divinity School, and the University of Pittsburgh. He has recently received honorary doctorates from Bethany College and West Liberty University in recognition of his life’s work. In honor of the West Virginia Sesquicentennial, Marc was commissioned by the Wheeling National Heritage Area to write a poem celebrating this event and so on June 20th his poem “A Song for West Virginia” was presented in both Charleston and Wheeling as a part of the day-long festivities. It has recently been reprinted by the Quarrier Press, Charleston, WV.

    Robinson & McElwee PLLC is sponsoring the 2015 Little Lecture Series. Founded in Charleston in 1983, the law firm serves clients throughout West Virginia and Ohio.

    Admission to the lecture is $10 and includes a reception after the program. People interested in attending should call the Humanities Council at 304-346-8500.

    Little Lecture Series is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Civil War mural dedication

    March 29, 2015 — Marlinton, Pocahontas

    On Palm Sunday 1865, Lee and Grant met at Appomattox, marking the end of the Civil War. This Palm Sunday, 150 years later, will mark the dedication of a mural commemorating the lives of civilians in the Pocahontas County area during that war. The mural, by local artist Molly Must, is on the Motor Parts building, just a block east of the McClintic Library on Route 39 in Marlinton. The event will take place at 2 p.m. In case of inclement weather, the ceremony will be moved to the Pocahontas County Opera House, just a couple of blocks away.

    Speakers will include the artist; Kay Goodwin, WV Secretary of Education and the Arts and Chair of the WV Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission; Paul Quigley, James L Robertson Jr. Professor in Civil War Studies at Virginia Tech; and County Commission President Bill Beard. Rob Taggart will provide Civil War music, and Jason Bauserman will portray Elder John Kline, a prominent Brethren minister of the period.

    Funding for the mural was provided by The West Virginia Civil War Sesquicentennial Commission, the Pocahontas County Commission, and the Pocahontas County CVB. Floyd Davis, Jr. offered the wall of his business as a home for the mural. The Civil War mural project was sponsored by the Pocahontas County Free Libraries, which also sponsored Molly Must’s “Last Forest” mural on First Avenue in Marlinton.

  • West Virginians and the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln

    June 19, 2015 — Huntersville, Pocahontas WVHC Event

    West Virginians and the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau with Michael Woods. 7PM June 19 at the Old Huntersville School. Free.

    Sesquicentennial Speakers Bureau is a project of the West Virginia Humanities Council.

  • Symphonie Fantastique, French Festival, Fuchs, and Biegel

    May 20, 2016 — Wheeling, Ohio

    Symphonie Fantastique, French Festival, Fuchs, and Biegel

    8:00PM May 20 at the Capitol Theatre in Wheeling

    This French inspired program connects various arts disciplines. The highlight of this concert is the co-commissioned Piano Concerto by Kenneth Fuchs written for Jeffrey Biegel. Mr. Fuchs was commissioned by the Wheeling Symphony to write Forever Free for West Virginia’s Sesquicentennial. The concert opens with Chabrier’s playful Joyeuse Marche while thoughts of love abound in Faure’s Pelléas et Mélisande. Continuing the theme of love, Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique will close the program and end the 2015-16 Season with tremendous power!

    http://www.wheelingsymphony.com/

West Virginia Humanities Council | 1310 Kanawha Blvd E | Charleston, WV 25301 Ph. 304-346-8500 | © 2020 All Rights Reserved

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